Congregation Based Community Organizing

 

Congregation-Based Community Organizing is a part of the Presbyterian Hunger Program

The promise of com­mu­nity, and the tes­ti­mony of orga­niz­ing, is that we will dis­cover resources in such abun­dance that not only will the com­mu­nity dis­cover its capac­ity to meet its own needs, but our own spir­its will be fed in the process.

-Jef­frey Kre­hbiel, From Crowd to Community

About Congregation-Based Community Organizing

Congregation-Based Community Organizing is another component of Presbyterian Hunger Program’s work. CBCO is a strategy for rebuilding communities, revitalizing congregations and developing individuals into effective leaders and change agents.  There are over 180 congregation-based community organizations across the country, and through a percentage of One Great Hour of Sharing offering funds, PHP has provided funding for most of them, either in the start up phase or in their on-going efforts with affordable housing and homelessness. These organizations provide a vehicle for churches, schools, unions, and non-profit organizations to carry their concerns and values into public life, as they create policy and hold those in power accountable for their decisions.

If you have any questions about this, please contact Andrew Kang Bartlett at (502) 569-5388 or by email.

Congregation-Based Community Organizing

Congregation-Based Community Organizing (CBCO) is a strategy for rebuilding communities, revitalizing congregations and developing individuals into effective leaders and change agents.  There are over 180 congregation based community organizations across the country, and through a percentage of OGHS funds, PHP has provided funding for most of them, either in the start up phase or in their on-going efforts with affordable housing and homelessness. These organizations provide a vehicle for churches, schools, unions, and non-profit organizations to carry their concerns and values into public life, as they create policy and hold those in power accountable for their decisions.

Below are a few articles and resources on community organizing.


Soul to soul (Presbyterian News Service, 2013)
‘Relational meetings’ are effective tool for successful community organizing.

Love, Justice, and Saving Homes (PHP Post, 2011)
Clergy and lay leaders hold signs of protest outside the church to stop the foreclosure and eviction of one of a member.

Fighting Poverty (Presbyterians Today, 2007)
By building grassroots coalitions, congregations are empowering ordinary people to work for change.

Building Bridges, Building Power: Developments in Institution Based (InterFaith Funders, 2012)
The State of the Field study provides an up-to-date picture of the field of institution-based community organizing and draws on data from Interfaith Funders’ 1999 study to show how the field has changed over the last decade.

CBCO Bibliography (2013)
A brief listing of books related to the history and practice of community organizing.

“Community organizing has provided tools for church members to be effective leaders and has been a catalyst for positive social change”

—David Thornton, Grace Memorial United Presbyterian Church

Congregation-Based Community Organizing Grants

Congregation-Based Community Organizing (CBCO) is a strategy for rebuilding communities, revitalizing congregations and developing individuals into effective leaders and change agents. A CBCO is generally a coalition of congregations (usually interfaith in nature), service providers and community groups whose common mission is to listen to community residents, identify critical issues and respond in strategic ways that affect the quality of life of the community.

The Presbyterian Church has been a catalyst in the evolution of this movement since its inception in the 1950s. The denomination has been one of the major funders nationally and hundreds of congregations have been involved at the grassroots level.

Many CBCOs are related to national training networks (such as IAF, DART, PICO and Gamaliel) or they may be more independent in nature and training. What they share is a commitment that acting in the public arena from a faith perspective is critical in holding institutions accountable for building a just society.

CBCO START UP GRANTS

These grants fund new broad-based community organizations that are less than three years old. These grants are committed for one year at a time and an organization is eligible for a maximum of three years funding. They do not have to be consecutive grants. The grants sum range generally from $5,000 to $6,000 depending on the demonstrated need. Only online applications will be considered.

CBCO HOUSING GRANTS

These funds support the advocacy work of CBCOs in the areas of homelessness and affordable housing. The grants are specifically focused on the kind of public policy and economic strategies that effect a city or state. Generally the efforts of a congregation or a housing non-profit are not eligible for these grants unless  a part of a larger existing CBCO strategy.  These grants are only committed for one year at a time, but a CBCO is eligible for a total of five years funding. The grants sum range generally from $5,000 to $6,000 depending on the demonstrated need. Only online applications will be considered. Contact Trey Hammond if you have any questions about the eligibility of your organization at (505) 239-8674.

The application deadline for funding is May 31.  Only applications submitted online will be considered.  After eligibility has been determined, please complete the online application below:

Decisions regarding grant awards will be made at the Presbyterian Hunger Program Advisory Committee in October.

Please contact Andrew Kang Bartlett at (502) 569-5388 to discuss grant eligibility or access to the online application.


Community Organizing Network Training Grants

Grants are available for community organization training efforts of large national training networks and smaller regional training events. These networks generally provide training slots for Presbyterian leadership at national training events of the major networks, such as IAF, PICO, DART, Gamaliel Foundation, IVP, and others. As well, these grants have supported other organizations whose primary interest is community organizing training.

Community Organizing Network Training grant applications for 2017 will be accepted through May 31, 2017. Decisions regarding grant awards will be made at the October meeting of the Presbyterian Hunger Program Advisory Committee.

Please contact Andrew Kang Bartlett at (502) 569-5388 to discuss grant eligibility or access to the online application.


Scholarships for Individuals Attending Community Organizing Training

The Presbyterian Hunger Program provides scholarships up to $500 to help Presbyterians attend training events run by the national networks of community organizing (such as IAF, PICO, DART and Gamaliel Foundation).

Scholarship applications are accepted throughout the year. All applications must include a current W-9 form. To discuss grant eligibility or access to the online application, please contact Andrew Kang Bartlett at Andrew.KangBartlett@pcusa.org or (502) 569-5388.