Posts Categorized: Climate Change

Haitian farmers and civil society peacefully demand social reforms

By Cindy Corell | Mission Co-worker Haiti Haiti operates daily in crisis mode. Eighty percent of Haitians survive on less than $2.40 a day. Inflation puts the price of daily necessities further and further out of reach for the average family. The cost of education, too, is rising, so parents will do without to send… Read more »

Haiti: Land use and the environment

By Fabienne Jean | Coordinator for FONDAMA   Before it was colonized, the island     of Haiti was inhabited    by a people who depended mainly and traditionally on natural resources. These people lived and produced their food with methods that respected the “Pachamama,” a term meaning “Our mother, the earth.” With the Treaty of Ryswick (1697), the island… Read more »

One Year after Hurricane Matthew

Haitians continue to recover from the devastation and find hope sprouting in the garden By Cindy Correl | Mission Co-worker, FONDAMA, Joining Hands Haiti When the storm had passed, dazed survivors looked out from broken houses to count the cost. More than 500 people dead, by some counts as many as 1,000. Livestock killed. Gardens flushed… Read more »

The Time is Now to Care for Water

From Water Wars to Climate Change, Bolivians are Faced with Growing Water Scarcity By Oscar Rea Campos | Foundation for Community Axión, a member of UMAVIDA The year 2000 in Bolivia was the year of the “Water War.” Under pressure from the World Bank, the government of Bolivia privatized the public water supply of Cochabamba,… Read more »

Water Ceremony Seeks to Restore What Mining Has Dried Up

By Alejandrina Ibañez Aramayo | UMAVIDA Twenty years ago, the Peñas Canyon, located in the Pazña Municipality and Department of Oruro, Bolivia, was a prosperous community that thrived from diverse, agricultural production, including potato, quinoa, fodder, broad beans, corn, a variety of tubers, etc. But now, the community solely depends on livestock subsistence farming for… Read more »

Up in Smoke: Report highlights flaws in global carbon trading system

Presbyterian Hunger Program partner Social Action in Nigeria recently published a report Up in Smoke: Gas Flaring, Communities and Carbon Trading in Nigeria. As nations attempt to address the growing challenge of increasing greenhouse gas emissions, impoverished communities in countries like Nigeria stand to lose out. The Kyoto Protocol of 1997 established an international system for trading carbon… Read more »