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environment

Quest for environmental justice continues in La Oroya, Peru

In late June, mere days after winning Pero’s presidential election by a thin margin, Pedro Pablo Kuczynski turned his eyes on the troubled community of La Oroya, where for more than 15 years Presbyterian World Mission and the Presbyterian Hunger Program have joined with partners Joining Hands Peru (Red Uniendo Manos Peru) in seeking justice for city’s residents.

COP22 Climate Change Conference gets underway in Marrakech

World leaders and government officials from nearly 200 countries are gathering for the next two weeks in Marrakech for the 22nd Conference of Parties (COP22), part of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Clergy gather to add solidarity to Standing Rock water protectors

The Cannon Ball (North Dakota) Gym was filled to capacity tonight with nearly 500 clergy representing 20 faith traditions in anticipation of their show of solidarity for self-described “water protectors” opposing the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) north of Standing Rock Sioux reservation lands.

Presbyterians join Lummi Nation to fight fossil fuel projects in the Northwest

For the Lummi Nation, proposed fossil fuel development, transport and export of coal and oil could drastically impact their way of life. The Native American tribe, located in western Washington State has been battling proposed terminals, oil and coal trains, and pipelines arguing that such projects create a tremendous environmental threat to their homeland and the region.

PC(USA) offers support for Standing Rock Sioux protest in North Dakota

The Rev. Dr. J. Herbert Nelson, II, Stated Clerk of the General Assembly, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), in conjunction with the Rev. Irvin Porter, associate in the Office of Native American Intercultural Congregational Support, issued a statement today in support of the Standing Rock Sioux protest of a crude oil pipeline set to skirt the northern border of the tribe’s reservation lands. A breach, they say, is a threat to the Missouri River, the source of the tribe’s drinking water.