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dakota access pipeline

Centuries of dishonor

As we observe Native American Heritage Month, it is important to recognize that Native Americans have been on the frontlines of social reform in the United States since Europeans arrived in the 1400s.

Facebook Live video featuring Rick Ufford-Chase and leaders of the Ramapough Lunaape Nation now available

On Thursday, April 20, at noon EDT on the PC(USA)’s Facebook page, as part of its “Third Thursdays” series, ruling elder Rick Ufford-Chase, the Presbyterian Mission Agency’s associate for interfaith formation and co-director of the PC(USA)’s Stony Point Center, welcomed as his dialogue partners Chief Dwaine Perry and Two Clouds, both of the Ramapough Lunaape Nation, which is located about thirty miles northwest of New York City in the Ramapough Mountains.

Our water is life … we’re doing this for everybody

In November, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) leaders stood in solidarity with Native American tribes and groups protesting the construction of the Dakota access pipeline and its encroachment upon Native American lands. More than 20 PC(USA) representatives joined a 500-person gathering of clergy and lay leaders at Oceti Sakowin prayer camp November 3, after the local church community at Standing Rock put out a call for clergy witness.

MRTI urges Phillips 66 to reconsider DAPL investment

The Mission Responsibility Through Investment (MRTI) committee of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) submitted a shareholder resolution to the Phillips 66 Corporation on November 22 urging it to reconsider its investment guidelines as they pertain to the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) and future projects.

‘Our water is life… We’re doing this for everybody.’

Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) leaders have been standing in solidarity with Native American tribes and groups protesting the construction of the Dakota access pipeline and its encroachment upon Native American lands.

Water protectors at Standing Rock prepare for brutal winter

While the setting sun cast long shadows over the land, residents of the Sacred Stone Camp gathered near a community campfire as volunteers nearby prepared the evening meal. Children and a handful of dogs welcomed the night as if it were day, running and playing, oblivious to the changing weather and the cause that brought so many to the Missouri River in Cannon Ball, North Dakota.