Presbyterians Today

How to make learning fun

Add new life to your religious education program this fall with these 10 church-tested ideas.

Building enduring peace in South Sudan

The PC(USA)’s Peace & Global Witness Offering helps war-torn South Sudanese meet urgent needs and engage in the vital ministry of peacemaking.

Helping communities help themselves

The Community Health Evangelism initiative helps African communities take ownership and control over the projects and programs that affect them — with impressive results.

Wisdom Journey: A Declaration of God-Dependence

The Declaration of Independence was an incredible document. For the first time in history, or at least for the first time in a history that lasted, it was declared that people have inalienable rights, endowed by God, that a government should protect and defend.

Faithful civil engagement

I remember how shocked I was the first time I heard the question. As I stood in the receiving line during my first year as an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), one of the parishioners asked point-blank, “Pastor, do you love Jesus or the social gospel?”

Principles of investing

If you’re fortunate to have a 401(k) or IRA but know little about investments, chances are you spend a minimal amount of time reviewing your quarterly statement — a quick glance at the numbers to see if they’re up or down. But do you really know where your hard-earned dollars go?

What Presbyterians Believe: Blessed!

Presbyterians are generally allergic to the prosperity gospel, the belief among many Christians that God blesses those who bless God. Prosperity gospel is a good idea, but it begins to get tricky when we believe that those who are faithful to God will always be blessed by financial wealth and good health.

My Faith at Work: My ministry? Eating school lunches

When I retired from teaching in an inner city high school in Fresno I thought I was done with being involved with the local school district. Twenty-one years as a teacher was enough for me. My retirement plan was to move to San Francisco and get a job with a nonprofit.