Posts Categorized: Earth Care

Presbyterians and Utmost Leadership in Earth’s Climate Crisis

group photo of PEC at Stony Pt Center By James R. Turner, guest writer from Presbyterians for Earth Care Humanity has only another decade left to achieve a decisive shift in our energy regime, so that we do not leave our children an Earth that is ravaged by climate heating. In “Investing in a Green Future: A Vision for a Renewed Creation” the… Read more »

Celebrating Agroecology on the International Day of Biological Diversity!

Farmers weeding in NY “We’re part of the solution!” … is the slogan for this year’s UN International Day of Biological Diversity, which the world has celebrated on May 22, since 1993. The International Day for Biological Diversity bolsters the Sustainable Development Goals and highlights the United Nations’ Convention on Biological Diversity, a multilateral treaty signed by all the… Read more »

Food Justice Ministry at Presbyterian Church of Burlington

burlington food justice members Food-Centered Mission By Eric Diekhans; cross-posted from Presbyterians for Earth Care Like much of New England, the land surrounding Burlington, Massachusetts, located fifteen miles north of Boston, was once dotted with farms. But today, most produce in this relatively affluent community is factory farmed and comes from hundreds or even thousands of miles away. The… Read more »

National Capital Presbytery Divests from Fossil Fuels. Happy Earth Day!

divest from fossil fuel graphic By Anne-Fleur Winter, from Warner Memorial Presbyterian Church, and Claire Wilson-Black, from Fairlington Presbyterian Church On March 23st, 2021, National Capital Presbytery voted to divest from fossil fuels, stating: “Whereas; National Capital Presbytery expresses its profound concern about the destructive effects of climate change on all God’s creation, including a disproportionate impact on communities of… Read more »

A Prayer for Summer’s End

collage of food pics by Jessica Maudlin, Associate for Sustainable Living and Earth Care Concerns, PHP God of all that surrounds us, As we step into this new season of fall, we pause to acknowledge the delights of summer. Even though it was, for many, a year of cancelled plans, postponed vacations and drive-by parades instead of back yard… Read more »

Aloha from Oahu

ag work Cross-post from Eco-Steward Blog, written by Vickie Machado on May 14, 2018 We’ve just completed another wonderful week of exploring the connection between faith and environment here in beautiful Kailua, Oahu where fourteen of us gathered for the Eco-Stewards Hawaii Special Edition. It was a tremendous week of learning, sharing, receiving and giving that we… Read more »

Waiting for life renewed!

The life-giving warmth of spring is almost upon us!  But still we wait for the new impulse coming our way… 1)  In Lent, we reflect on Christ’s ministry, death, and resurrection. We slow down, take time, and examine our internal spiritual lives and the way we live out our Christian faith in the world around. This… Read more »

Salmon named MVP! (Most Valuable Piscis)

Young husband and wife at vigil Salmon figured prominently at the Presbyterians for Earth Care Conference held along Oregon’s Columbia River in September. These beautiful creatures are the traditional and cultural heart of the Columbia River tribes. As the keystone species, salmon not only created the biologically-diverse ecosystems of the region, but they also form the economic foundation for the indigenous… Read more »

Flow, the Eternal You, and the neighborhood creek:

Deffenbaugh writes, “Buber recognizes in a very practical way that our experience of nature is often unexceptional and routine. How quickly we take for granted the enchanting beauty of the mountains or the rolling streams we see everyday. How easily they become objects in our world. But there are moments, Buber suggests, when a person can hear in crisp tones the enigmatic language of the fields, can for a brief time – often just an instant – delve beneath the It-world and come face to face with the Eternal You. 

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Power on our Plates

When my daughter was in kindergarten, she would inspect her friends’ strawberries at lunchtime. “No no, you don’t want to eat that,” she would solemnly inform them. “It’s not organic. It might have yucky chemicals on it.”

Yucky chemicals indeed. Studies continue to pile up showing how pesticides on food can be harmful, especially to children’s health. As we head into the home stretch of the holiday feast season, I’ve been thinking hard about the powerful ripple effects of our food choices. Turns out, what we eat matters. A lot. (from Pesticides Action Network’s “Power on our plates“)

boy with kale in the snowIt does matter because “you are what you eat” is not an allegory; it is literally true. The substances that pass between your lips become your very own skin, muscle, cartilage, ligaments, nails, bones, blood, lymph and cerebral spinal fluid. Not to mention your organs, nerve cells and the two dozen digestive enzymes that break down food.

Take, for example, my daughter’s now-favorite veggie, spinach: USDA found residues of 48 pesticides on their official samples. Of these, 25 are suspected to interfere with human hormones, eight are linked to cancer, eight are neurotoxins and 23 are toxic to honeybees. Yucky. Knowing all this makes the organic spinach from our local farm taste especially good.

Unlike pre-WWII food, today’s food typically delivers one or more poisons to our cells because industrial farming, and its chemical dealers — Monsanto, Bayer, Syngenta, BASF, Dow, Dupont and others — are at war with weeds and pests. But many pests keep winning as they develop resistence. Ever more toxins are needed. Children are most effected because they eat more fruits and vegetables and are more sensitive. But it is often when we are adults that the long-term effects hit us.
What to do?
1) First, educate yourself by finding out what’s on your food (you can search by food item or pesticide)
2) Second. Consider joining Pesticides Action Network; becoming a PCUSA Earth Care Congregation and joining Presbyterians for Earth Care.
3) Third. Thank the next farmer you meet who is engaging in sustainable and organic practices and buy their last bunch of kale!

 

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