World Mission

The Mango Palace may be the key to lifting Malagasy farmers out of poverty

One of the long-term effects of COVID-19 in some of the world’s most vulnerable countries will be widespread famine. In Madagascar, where the average person lives on less than $250 a year, the FJKM (Church of Jesus Christ in Madagascar) fruit tree center at Mahatsinjo will help offset the impact of hunger in one of the poorest countries in the world.

May 15 commemorates Nakba (Catastrophe) Day for Palestinians

As the world continues to grapple with the coronavirus pandemic, and with the anxiety and insecurity as well as the staggering loss of life that it is causing, the fear that this crisis may be used to usurp power or control in certain parts of the world, or worse, to trample upon the human rights of those most vulnerable, is very real.

Connecting Korea’s past and present for the future of mission

Bridging the division in Korea through reunification is a dream of many. Another dream has been to compile the history of mission workers of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and partner churches in Korea from 1884 to the present. This connection of past and present mission workers in Korea by the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and partner churches in Korea has become reality in the publication of the first “Korean-English Dictionary of Presbyterian Missionaries in Korea 1884-2020,” published March 27 in Korean.

Malawi Mission Network partners help create 100,000 protective masks

While there is still much to learn about COVID-19, medical experts are certain that the virus is particularly deadly for people with underlying health conditions. In Malawi, a large portion of the nation’s 18 million residents fall into that category.

Grassroots home churches thrive in Rwanda

The Presbyterian Church in Rwanda opened its Center for Training and Documentation in 1996, two years after the genocide perpetrated against the Tutsi.

Answering God’s call to work with refugees in Greece

In the fall of 2015, mission co-worker Nadia Ayoub was attending a conference with colleagues in Budapest when the city’s Keleti train station became the epicenter of the refugee crisis overwhelming Europe. She could not forget the images of children sleeping on cardboard, families with not enough to eat and the pervasive fear of what would happen next. At that moment she felt a strong call to work with refugees.

One hundred days of mission and ministry in Rwanda

The Presbyterian Church of Rwanda (EPR) is a few weeks into its annual 100 days of remembrance of the genocide against the Tutsi, which extends from early April through July 4. Each year these days are devoted to helping bring healing to survivors of the genocide who continue to struggle with poverty, unemployment, sickness and other issues. All 212 parishes in EPR’s seven presbyteries are focused on the transformational power of the gospel to bring unity, reconciliation and restoration to all who have been traumatized — from one generation to the next.