Coronavirus/COVID-19 Resources for Congregations and Members

COVID-19 Mental Health Resources

 

Each day is bringing new changes to daily life that would have been unthinkable a month ago, a week ago or even yesterday. Many excellent resources are available, with more being generated every day. This is a curated “short list” gathered from trusted sources and grouped by intended audience. Additions will be made as new resources are identified and vetted.

For Everyone

  • Mental Well-Being During a Pandemic.
    Produced by the Presbyterian Mental Health Network, this one-page, downloadable document is designed for congregations, clergy and communities. It offers tips on coping with emotions of stress, fear and panic, and tips for promoting mental and spiritual well-being in the unfolding context.
  • American Psychological Association.
    This is a comprehensive collection of resources and guidance for the general public, parents of children and adolescents, health-care workers and mental health clinicians. It is well-referenced and has reliable information with links to other excellent websites. The content offers help with coping with anxiety and stress, social distancing, media consumption, talking with children and adolescents, obtaining mental health support, and preventing pandemic-related stigmatization and racism.
  • National Disaster Distress Helpline. Toll-Free: 800-985-5990
    The Disaster Distress Helpline is available 24/7 for anyone experiencing distress or other mental health concerns during the COVID-19 outbreak. Calls (800-985-5990; press 2 for Spanish) and texts (text TalkWithUs to 66746) are answered by trained counselors from a network of independently operated crisis centers across the U.S. The helpline is funded by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and administered by Vibrant Emotional Health.
  • Taking Care of Your Behavioral Health: Tips for Social Distancing, Quarantine and Isolation During Disease Outbreak. Produced by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, this handout defines relevant terms, discusses emotions and connecting with others, and presents practical ways to cope and relax during an infectious disease outbreak.
  • Is There a Right Way to Worry about Coronavirus? And Other Mental Health Tips.
    This article from The Guardian newspaper in the United Kingdom offers solid information with a touch of dry British humor.

For Children

Congregations, Clergy, Church Leaders and Mid Councils

  • Mental Well-Being during a Pandemic.
    Produced by the Presbyterian Mental Health Network, this one-page, downloadable document is designed for congregations, clergy and communities. It offers tips on coping with emotions of stress, fear and panic, and tips for promoting mental and spiritual well-being.
  • Precaution as a Spiritual Practice.
    This link features a powerful image and a two-minute video message by Jason Whitehead, a member of the Denver Presbytery Mental Health Task Force who is also on the Steering Committee of the Presbyterian Mental Health Network. It is a brief look into social distancing as a spiritual practice with a caution of how it affects marginalized communities.
  • Trauma Pastoral Care Series (Training Videos).
    Produced by Presbyterian Disaster Assistance, this series of 15 videos is intended for pastors caring for those experiencing human-caused trauma or experiencing trauma themselves. Not all of the videos will apply to the current context, but they provide helpful information about the dynamics of trauma, compassion fatigue and resilience.
  • Pandemic — a poem by Lynn Ungar, March 11, 2020.
    This poem reframes “social distancing” as a time to reach out with words, love and heart.

People with Pre-Existing Mental Health Concerns

  • NAMI Helpline Coronavirus Information and Resources Guide.
    This downloadable guide from the National Alliance on Mental Illness offers tips for people with mental health conditions along with advice about getting medication supplies, locating virtual therapy and more.
  • Mental Health America.
    This is a good collection of links to COVID-19 resources intended for people with specific mental health issues, such as substance-use disorders and others.