Posts By: Jessica Maudlin

Earth Care Creates Space for Community

God Loves God Affirms Rainbow Sign All of the Presbyterian Hunger Program’s certified Earth Care Congregations commit themselves to a four-part pledge to take specific steps in four areas; worship, outreach, education and facilities. Additionally, that pledge affirms that the earth and all creation are God’s. The pledge acknowledges that God calls us to be careful, humble stewards of this earth,… Read more »

In Response to the UN’s IPCC Report

Golden Gate Park with orange sky background The United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change (IPCC) sixth assessment report provides clear scientific documentation that our world is truly in crisis. While it could be easy to be overwhelmed with the weight of this heavy news, our prayer is that it can also be a source of inspiration to continue critical work and activism… Read more »

Everyday God-talk: Fair Trade and Climate

Farmer feet with Coffee seedlings Everyday God-talk returns for its first official season using the lens of Reformed theology to focus on environmental justice and climate crisis. Everyday God-talk’ will offer four different episodes encouraging those watching to contemplate the everyday realities of God’s Creation.  Each is based on the four major book titles of Calvin’s “The Institutes of the Christian… Read more »

‘We are tearing down the Creation God has given to us’

On the eve of Monday’s dire UN climate report, the Stated Clerk offers Presbyterians for Earth Care words that challenge all of us to do better by Mike Ferguson | Presbyterian News Service Photo by Landon Parenteau via Unsplash LOUISVILLE — On the eve of a United Nations report released Monday that predicts dire and nearly immediate… Read more »

Fall PHP Post

Center Spread of Environmental Racism We are so excited to unveil the latest issue of the PHP Post!!! In the Dismantling Structural Racism issue you will find articles on… Global racism, colonialism and white supremacy Deep Links Between Racism and Climate Change Reparations Cannot Wait Resource Extraction and Racism We Take a Matthew 25 Stand PHP and Decolonizing Wealth POSTER… Read more »

PHP’s 2020 Impact Report

PHP embraces the PC(USA) vision of Matthew 25 that encourages us to see Christ in those who are hungry, thirsty, imprisoned and oppressed and to engage our work to “alleviate hunger and eliminate its causes” as a central way to live out our calling. Through speaking and teaching, supporting grant partners, producing educational and worship… Read more »

Matthew 25 and the Presbyterian Hunger Program

Matthew 25 Poster The PC(USA) has committed itself to a vision of Matthew 25 — eradicating systemic poverty, dismantling structural racism and building congregational vitality. In the Presbyterian Hunger Program (PHP), we are excited about this vision because we have long worked to: 1. Alleviate and eliminate poverty and hunger 2. Redistribute resources for all people as we… Read more »

Good Friday Reflection: A Face in The Crowd

Not at the foot but near enough the cross I stand, close enough to say I am. One foot in, one foot away. I take my place as witness on this hill called Golgatha, the place of the skull. Not a full five days ago, I stood in another crowd, hearing the Hosanna echo off… Read more »

PHP and Growing Hope Globally Grow Impact

The Presbyterian Church (USA)—through the Presbyterian Hunger Program and Presbyterian Disaster Assistance as well as local congregations—has had a decades-long partnership with Growing Hope Globally, an organization that connects U.S. farmers, churches and communities to subsistence farmers around the world in order to help address hunger. The Presbyterian Hunger Program is at work around the world and specifically has been… Read more »

Eco-Palms: Creativity and Caring for Creation in Trying Times

I recently learned a new word that I thought was appropriate for the year we have all just navigated together: Tohubohu toh-hoo-BOH-hoo a state of chaos; utter confusion. If ever a year was appropriate to be deemed tohubohu it was 2020. It is hard to believe after all that has happened, that it could even… Read more »