Worshiping Communities

Jesus showed us ‘internal resurrection’

“How good it is to center down! To sit quietly and see one’s self pass by!” With these words the Rev. Jeff Eddings opened  Wednesday’s The Way of Spiritual Fortitude, quoting a mediation from theologian and mystic the Rev. Dr. Howard Thurman.

Money matters

One of the most frequently asked questions about the nearly 700 new worshiping communities launched in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) since 2012 is, “How long does it take a new worshiping community to become financially sustainable?”  This question is surrounded by similar ones about funding communities of new disciples, building solid financial skills and practices, budgets, salaries, giving and grants.

Finding our way by developing spiritual fortitude

For church and worshiping community leaders, the Way of Spiritual Fortitude is apparently paved with good intentions, including intending to regularly practice self-care in the midst of long hours doing ministry that can be as demanding as it is draining.

‘I was quickly approaching burnout’

For seven years, Nick Pickrell, organizer of The Open Table in Kansas City, Missouri, has been hustling to keep the new worshiping community afloat. There was a lot of grant writing and developing — not to mention the community’s antiracism training business. Finally, this summer, Pickrell was able to take a break, thanks to Sabbath & Sabbatical Grants from the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)’s 1001 New Worshiping Communities movement.

United with Christ — and thus with God

In the latest episode of Everyday God-talk, the host, the Rev. Dr. Barry Ensign-George, uses one of the key books of the Reformed tradition to explore how God’s work of healing in a broken world takes hold in our life.