Today In The Mission Yearbook

‘Knit Wits’ Teach Children Lost Art of Knitting at Presbyterian Camp

Student demonstrates French knitting with handheld spool

Student demonstrates French knitting with handheld spool

A group of seniors who call themselves the Knit Wits thought it would be fun to teach children the lost art of knitting, a skill they all were all expected to learn in their youth. The seniors are residents of Presbyterian Village North, a retirement community in northern Dallas. When Presbyterian Village North held Camp PVN, a camp held in partnership with Preston Hollow Presbyterian Church and NorthPark Presbyterian Church, children and seniors spent time together during “gift hours,” where residents imparted their knowledge of hobbies, interests, and activities with participating children. As a result, members of the Knit Wits group used some of the camp’s gift hours to teach children how to do French knitting with handheld spools. This activity was meaningful to the senior residents because they had learned how to knit and crochet at around the same ages as the children in the camp. Among all 12 members, it is estimated the group has a combined 500 years of experience, as many were taught at a young age and have been doing it all their lives.

Judy Morris, a member of the Knit Wits group, learned to knit when she was 10 years old. Though today’s parents do not pass down this talent to their children the way parents used to, Morris believes it is making a comeback with young adults who are eager to experience something new. The Knit Wits were excited to see the joy that radiated from the children’s faces as they created something unique. The residents spent four days working with the children, helping them to make flowers, headbands, and other creative items. After hosting this series of activities, they are contemplating hosting other tutorials during school breaks and on weekends. They experienced much joy in passing down their family knowledge of knitting and crocheting.

 The Knit Wits also have discussed using their talents to make items like scarves, hats, and lap blankets for people in need, such as soldiers, the homeless, and hospitalized children. The group started just a few months ago, so they are still discussing how to use knitting to help others. In the meantime, members meet once a week to work on their own knitting and crocheting projects and to share their patterns, yarn, advice, and stories.

Lauren Witt, Senior Account Executive, Presbyterian Village North

Today’s Focus: Grace Presbytery

Let us join in prayer for:


Preston Hollow Presbyterian Church
Staff
Rev. Matthew Ruffner, Pastor
Dr. Paul Seelman, Executive Pastor
Rev. Sarah A. Johnson, Associate Pastor, Congregational Care
Rev. Laura Fitzgibbon, Interim Associate Pastor, Discipleship
Dr. Bob Poteet, Parish Associate

NorthPark Presbyterian Church Staff

Brent Barry, Pastor Head of Staff
Kelly Staples, Associate Pastor Director of Youth Ministries
M.E. Clary, Director of Media & Church Relations
Ellen Mata, Director of Mission & Older Adult Programs
Kathy McCarron, Director of Children & Family Ministries

PC(USA) Agencies’ Staff

Laurie Griffith, OGA
Leann Gritton, PMA

Let us pray

Holy God, you faithfully move in every generation of your people. Help us celebrate the gifts of our brothers and sisters who live in nursing homes and similar settings. Help us remember to include them in our church ministries, and help us appreciate the wisdom in their stories. And Lord, remind us that at every age we are still your precious children. Amen.

Daily Lectionary

Morning Psalms 130; 148
First Reading Hosea 13:9-16
Second Reading Acts 28:1-16
Gospel Reading Luke 9:28-36
Evening Psalms 32; 139