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Presbyterians Today

Faithful civil engagement

I remember how shocked I was the first time I heard the question. As I stood in the receiving line during my first year as an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), one of the parishioners asked point-blank, “Pastor, do you love Jesus or the social gospel?”

Principles of investing

If you’re fortunate to have a 401(k) or IRA but know little about investments, chances are you spend a minimal amount of time reviewing your quarterly statement — a quick glance at the numbers to see if they’re up or down. But do you really know where your hard-earned dollars go?

What Presbyterians Believe: Blessed!

Presbyterians are generally allergic to the prosperity gospel, the belief among many Christians that God blesses those who bless God. Prosperity gospel is a good idea, but it begins to get tricky when we believe that those who are faithful to God will always be blessed by financial wealth and good health.

My Faith at Work: My ministry? Eating school lunches

When I retired from teaching in an inner city high school in Fresno I thought I was done with being involved with the local school district. Twenty-one years as a teacher was enough for me. My retirement plan was to move to San Francisco and get a job with a nonprofit.

Big Tent 2017 reflects new approach to big gatherings

‘How should the church respond when sin disrupts the church’s unity, creates division among the children of God, and constructs unjust systems that steal life from God’s creation?’ This question begins the introduction of the Belhar Confession in the PC(USA)’s Book of Confessions.

Principles of investing

MRTI implements the General Assembly’s policies on socially responsible investing by engaging companies in which the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) owns stock.

Into the light

Lee McDermott is concerned. Opioid addiction is rapidly sweeping out of control in his neighborhood. And while the Presbyterian pastor in a rural southwestern Pennsylvania community is not only worried for those who are struggling with these habits, he’s also troubled by the fact that many religious leaders refuse to face the problem. And many congregants don’t want to talk about it. As a result, families end up living in fear and shame.

Civil Engagement

Politics can divide a church. I remember how shocked I was the first time I heard the question. As I stood in the receiving line during my first year as an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), one of the parishioners asked point-blank, “Pastor, do you love Jesus or the social gospel?”

Spotlight on leaders: Betty Tom

Becoming a Presbyterian pastor was nowhere on the Rev. Dr. Betty Tom’s radar. She had attended Baptist and Pentecostal churches most of her life and was serving in a nondenominational church, and she was content. However, Tom’s life took an unexpected turn when she enrolled in seminary. As she worked her way through the courses of Christian Theological Seminary (CTS) in Indianapolis, the time came for her to do her supervised field experience, when seminarians go to work in their field of study in a church.