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Racial Ethnic Diversity

‘Melting Pot’ no longer!

I am an immigrant and a former refugee. I came from Cuba to the United States via Spain in the late ’60s. I belong to that group of people from the “Global South’’ who began migrating to this country by the millions after the liberalization of immigration laws in 1965.

Facing racism — a meal at a time

It’s been a good year for hate.  Melanie Rodenbough, a lifelong Presbyterian, lives in North Carolina. In early 2017, she learned from the news that the FBI was beginning an investigation after an audio recording of a meeting of conservative activists near Winston-Salem revealed death threats against Muslims living in the area. 

Hands & Feet initiative launched in St. Louis

The genesis of the Hands & Feet initiative came from Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Stated Clerk, the Rev. Dr. J. Herbert Nelson II, after his experience at the 222nd General Assembly (2016) in Portland. He had never seen so many homeless people in one place.

Freedom Rising initiative receives major gifts

Freedom Rising, a Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) initiative “to address and improve the worsening plight of the African-American male,” has received gifts totaling $78,461 from a Pittsburgh-based charitable foundation, two mid-councils and an offering collected at a Presbyterian collegiate conference.

Freedom Rising gains traction in pilot cities

High incarceration rates, widespread unemployment and low educational attainment among African American young men have led some observers to call them a “lost generation.” However, the Rev. Mary Susan Pisano rejects this description.

Facing up to our racism

In a few weeks, many of us will make our way to a place we call home in observance of Thanksgiving, our most religiously secular and secularly religious holiday. Gathered around a table of plenty, we will partake and share, acknowledging God’s gracious bounty to all and giving thanks for it.

White parents, black sons

Martin Luther King Jr. spoke these words at Glenville High School in Cleveland on April 26, 1967. Several things have happened that have had me mulling on this concept of “somebodiness” and how, 50 years later, MLK’s words here are still so strikingly relevant.

We are the racist culture

I can still remember my first encounter with an overt racist. I must have been 8 or 9, and my friend and I were in the back seat. Her mom was driving and started talking to me.