Racial Justice Resources

Peace & Justice

COVID-19 helping to fuel global hunger

With the coronavirus continuing to infect scores of people daily worldwide, the number of people experiencing acute hunger is expected to skyrocket globally, and some partners of the Presbyterian Hunger Program say the economic ramifications of the pandemic already are hurting the ability of people around the globe to feed themselves and their families.

‘A virtual choir of international peacemakers’

Beth Mueller got a note from a man who saw the virtual choir of international peacemakers video she created for the Presbyterian Peacemaking Program and had a question. “He wanted to know how we got all those people from around the world to sing at the same time on Zoom,” Mueller said, laughing.

Domestic violence focus of final gun violence webinar

A little under a year after it launched, the Presbyterian Peacemaking Program’s gun violence prevention webinar series concluded Tuesday afternoon with a discussion about domestic violence.

Presbyterian Disaster Assistance grant helps network share lifesaving information in Haiti

As Americans watched the pandemic move across the globe with startling speed, we thought about our medically vulnerable relatives, our children and the elderly. We planned how to gather food and water, made sure we had medicine in our homes. We washed our hands, didn’t touch our face and if we had to leave the house, we put on a face mask. It was inconvenient, but for most of us, possible.

‘I can’t breathe’

Amid weeks of global preoccupation with the personal, social, economic, and political impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, the plight of the Palestinian people bears a growing, striking resemblance to George Floyd’s plea, “I can’t breathe.” Ever since 1967, the knee of Israel’s military occupation of the West Bank and Gaza has been increasingly and relentlessly pressing down on the Palestinians’ neck. 

How should we protest, and why?

Viisha P. Souza and Alan Kennedy were more than 1,000 miles apart last weekend, but had very similar experiences.

Iosso to leave ACSWP post to serve Church in a new ministry

After more than 14 years as coordinator of the Advisory Committee on Social Witness Policy (ACSWP) of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), Dr. Christian Iosso this week announced his decision to serve the Church in a new capacity.

Responding to the trauma of gun violence

The Rev. CeCe Armstrong had barely arrived in Charleston, South Carolina in June 2015, when a white supremacist opened fire on a Bible study class at Mother Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, killing nine people.