Disaster Response

The promise of abundant life

Presbyterians’ generosity to the One Great Hour of Sharing special offering gives the gift of abundant life to people in need.

A sweeping view of Latin America and the Caribbean in only 17 minutes

A new video produced by World Mission’s Latin America and Caribbean office takes viewers through a sweep of the region, checking in with mission co-workers and PC(USA) partners to help Presbyterians learn more about their work and their love for the region and its people.

Agents of change in Nigeria

Although Nigeria ranks among Africa’s richest nations, Ohel Swade would never know it.

How is Presbyterian Disaster Assistance helping in Ukraine?

Since Russia invaded Ukraine late last month, Presbyterian Disaster Assistance (PDA) has committed rapid response solidarity grants to five ecumenical partners in Eastern and Central Europe addressing the humanitarian crisis created by the unprovoked attack.

‘Just because you don’t see it in the news doesn’t mean it’s not happening’

While the misery and devastation millions of Ukrainians are facing currently dominate the headlines, broadcasts and many podcasts, the Rev. Edwin González-Castillo, who coordinates Presbyterian Disaster Assistance response in Latin America and the Caribbean, continues to see the long-term effects of natural disasters and the spike in refugees that’s resulted.

Doing something good in the face of evil

A few Sundays ago, the Rev. Brad Sheppard, pastor of Immanuel Presbyterian Church in Cincinnati, Ohio, received an email from the church’s accompanist, Diana Chubak, a doctoral student at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music. Earlier that day, Sheppard had asked Chubak to suggest organizations to support in the wake of the Russian invasion of her native Ukraine.

Refugees ‘just want to go home’

Asked during Monday’s Between Two Pulpits broadcast to discuss the need that’s on the hearts and minds of people around the world — the care and safety of millions of Ukrainian refugees and displaced people — Susan Krehbiel said what we often forget is that those who have fled the fighting “just want to go home. In these early days of war, people want to stay as close to home as possible. Once you are separated, it can be really hard to be reunited.”