Double the impact of your gift in support of mission co-workers GIVE NOW

Presbyterians Today

The give-and-take of Lent

A Q & A with Michelle Bartel – Coordinator of Theological Education and Seminary Relations for the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

Beyond bingo: The changing face of older adult ministry

At a time in her life when Joan Hurlock especially needed spiritual and emotional support, she found herself drifting away from her faith community after her husband of more than 50 years became chronically ill. Although well prepared for her role as caregiver, Hurlock felt overwhelmed and overburdened. But not wanting to leave her husband alone, she spent less and less time at church.

Lament, challenge and hope

Dr. Anthea Butler was stopped for driving while black in her late-model luxury car. As a flashlight shone on her boyfriend’s pale face, the police officer asked, “Did you pick her up somewhere?”

Talkin’ ’bout my generation

Does coming of age in a particular era decisively shape people’s values, habits and personalities? Yes, say some analysts.

Presbyterians Today to publish under new schedule, add two columns

The Rev. Susan Washburn, interim editor of Presbyterians Today, says the periodical is looking forward to a few changes in the new year as it seeks to more effectively engage readers and celebrate the good news of Christ’s work in the people and churches of the PC(USA).

A complete baptism

Presbyterians believe that baptism envelops our lives as Christians. As part of the covenant community, we baptize children as they grow into their faith.

The final frontier

As technology and medicine keep us alive longer and longer, we face challenging questions: How do we glorify God in our last few years of life? How can we respond faithfully with failing bodies?

The final frontier

As technology and medicine keep us alive longer and longer, we face challenging questions: How do we glorify God in our last few years of life? How can we respond faithfully with failing bodies?

The give-and-take of Lent

We use the season of Lent to prepare our hearts and minds for the mystery of the resurrection. But we all do that differently. Some churches place ashes on the foreheads of worshipers on Ash Wednesday; others don’t. Some “lock up” their “Alleluias” until Easter morning, others host a weekly fish fry, and still others hold special midweek justice or outreach programs. We decided to ask one of our theologians about the meaning and practices of Lent.