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“You give them something to eat.” Matt. 14:16

Ash Wednesday

A forehead marked with an ash cross.

Ash Wednesday begins the season of Lent with a public act of confession and contrition. Acknowledging that all have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God, we stand in solidarity as fellow creatures before our Creator, acutely aware of our mortality.  In the face of our transience, we pledge ourselves anew to live unto God’s Word in Jesus Christ, the eternal Word that remains forever.

Historically, Ash Wednesday was a time when penitents were presented for church discipline during Lent, culminating in reconciliation on Maundy Thursday. Ash Wednesday is also the occasion when would-be disciples of Christ known as catechumens were enrolled in the catechumenate, a special time of learning the basics of the faith in preparation for baptism on Easter Sunday or during the Easter Vigil. In some traditions, Ash Wednesday is a fast day, beginning the Lenten time of fasting and preparation for the Great Three Days that culminate in Easter.


A time to turn

An excerpt from the Companion to the Book of Common Worship (Geneva Press, 2003, 109-110)

The Lenten journey from the ashes of death to resurrected life begins on the first day of Lent, Ash Wednesday, which signifies a time to turn around, to change directions, to repent. This first day of Lent reminds us that unless we are willing to die to our old selves, we cannot be raised to new life with Christ. The first step of this journey calls us to acknowledge and confront our mortality, individually and corporately. In many traditions, this is symbolized through the imposition of ashes — placing a cross on one’s forehead. During the imposition of ashes the words: “You are dust, and to dust you shall return” (Genesis 3:19) are repeated again and again. We are to remember that we are but temporary creatures, always on the edge of death. On Ash Wednesday, we begin our Lenten trek through the desert toward Easter.

Ashes on the forehead is a sign of our humanity and a reminder of our mortality. Lent is not a matter of being good, and wearing ashes is not to show off one’s faith. The ashes are a reminder to us and our communities of our finite creatureliness. The ashes we wear on our Lenten journey symbolize the dust and broken debris of our lives as well as the reality that eventually each of us will die.

Trusting in the “accomplished fact” of Christ’s resurrection, however, we listen for the Word of God in the time-honored stories of the church’s Lenten journey. We follow Jesus into the wilderness, resist temptation, fast, and proceed “on the way” to Jerusalem and the cross. Our Lenten journey is one of metanoia (“turning around”), of changing directions from self-serving toward the self-giving way of the cross.


Lectionary readings for Ash Wednesday

Read the Revised Common Lectionary Scripture lessons for Ash Wednesday:

Ash Wednesday


Resources for Ash Wednesday

Ash Wednesday service

Lent begins with Ash Wednesday as a day of mourning for our sin and the sin of all humanity before God, a recognition of our mortality save for the grace of God and a request that the Lord remember our creation and breathe new life into our burned-out, dusty lives once more.

This is a service for the imposition of ashes and the remembrance of baptism based on the sermon’s assurance that though we are dust, we are baptized dust, and that makes all the difference.

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Solemn assembly

General Assembly urged churches to call a solemn assembly each year to repent of sin, and this is a service for such a solemn assembly since Ash Wednesday is a day of solemn assembly built into the church year calendar.

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Isaiah 58: A Choral Reading for Three Voices

This choral reading and hymn text are based on Isaiah 58:1-12, one of the Old Testament readings for Ash Wednesday.

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Prayers for Ash Wednesday

These prayers might be used in a variety of settings: Opening Prayers (at the beginning of worship) or concluding collects (after the Prayers of the People); for church websites or newsletters; or in personal, small group or family devotion.

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Fasting in the Bible and Reformed Tradition

Learn about fasting in the Bible and Reformed tradition.

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Transfiguration of the Lord | Season of Lent

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  • When did the imposition of ashes begin in the Presbyterian Church? by Patty Valdez on 03/04/2014 at 1:01 p.m.

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